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Tuesday, August 18, 2020 | History

4 edition of Clinical and metabolic effects of colonic fermentation found in the catalog.

Clinical and metabolic effects of colonic fermentation

Dawna Royall

Clinical and metabolic effects of colonic fermentation

by Dawna Royall

  • 242 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesCanadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19310195M
ISBN 10031556752X
OCLC/WorldCa25089222

  The authors determined that metabolites produced by microbial fermentation of fibers induced the production of the endogenous peptides glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP GLP-1 is known to have beneficial effects on glucose metabolism, and GLP-2 has been shown to improve intestinal epithelial tight junction integrity. Fermentation of undigested foods in the colon by its resident bacteria affects not only colonic health (protection against inflammation and tumour formation) but also influences metabolic health. Studying fermentation directly is difficult for lack of access. We hypothesise that the anatomical structure of the colon is suited to act as a fermenting chamber with the gaseous molecules (VOCs.

Recent evidence of the potential benefits of short chain fatty acids has prompted renewed interest in the area of human colonic fermentation. This paper reviews the clinical and metabolic consequences of colonic fermentation. Metabolite production and antioxidant released during colonic fermentation of naturally occurring dietary fiber (DF) from two European diets (Mediterranean and Scandinavian) were determined. With this aim, DF and associated components were isolated from both whole diets, as well as from cereals and fruits and vegetables comprising the diets. DF was used as substrate for colonic fermentation in.

Conversely, protein fermentation generates harmful metabolites but their relevance to gastrointestinal health is poorly understood. Aim To review the effects of increased protein fermentation on biomarkers of colonic health, factors influencing fermentative activity and potential for dietary modulation to minimise detrimental effects. The control and consequences of bacterial fermentation in the human colon. J.H. Cummings. Corresponding Author. Medical Research Council, Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Cambridge, UK. Dr J.H. Cummings, Medical Research Council, Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QL, UK. Bertha Irene Juárez-Flores.


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Clinical and metabolic effects of colonic fermentation by Dawna Royall Download PDF EPUB FB2

Colonic SCFA formation from fermentable carbohydrate is important for the maintenance of morphologic and functional integrity of the colonic epithelium. Carbohydrate-induced diarrhea occurs when the amount of carbohydrate entering the colon exceeds its fermentation capacity. Deficient availability or utilization of SCFA, mainly of n-butyrate, is the cause of diversion colitis and may play Cited by: Recent evidence has pointed to potential nutritional benefits of short chain fatty acids derived from colonic fermentation.

This paper reviews the clinical and metabolic consequences of colonic by:   Carbohydrates, SCFA, and colonic fermentation. Carbohydrates resistant to digestion and those that escape absorption in the small intestine are available for colonic bacterial fermentation resulting in the production of SCFA (acetic, butyric, and propionic acids) together with gases (CO 2, CH 4, and H 2) and heat (62, 63).Cited by: The metabolic activities of intestinal microorganisms therefore play a key role in host physiology in both health and disease.

1 Colonic bacteria are responsible 1 2. There is a history of interest in the metabolic effects of alterations in small intestinal digestion and colonic fermentation of carbohydrate. Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), as end products of the gut microflora-host metabolic interactions, are the principal anions which arise from bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary carbohydrates in the colon.

The principal metabolic activities of colonic microorganisms are associated with carbohydrate and protein digestion. Nutrients of dietary and host origin support the growth of intestinal organisms.

After a study of the colonic metabolic pathways of the individual compounds, the colonic fermentation of flavonoids and phenolic acids was evaluated by the fermentation of a nuts-cocoa cream enriched with these standards and those previously digested in vitro.

Materials and methods Chemicals. Although in an early stage, microbial metabolites generated during colonic fermentation of food stuffs may have beneficial or deleterious effects on intestinal health and immunity, as summarized in this review.

However, current evidence is largely based on in vitro and animal studies while substantiation in humans is lacking. Carbohydrate digestibility and metabolic effects. Wong JM(1), Jenkins DJ.

Author information: (1)Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. There is a history of interest in the metabolic effects of alterations in small intestinal digestion and colonic fermentation of carbohydrate. Cummings Hi, Hill W, Bone ES, Branch WJ, Jenkins DM () The effect of meat protein and dietary fiber on colonic function and metabolism.

Part II Bacterial metabolites in feces and urine. Am J Clin Nutr – Google Scholar. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel and pulp are a source of dietary fiber (DF) and phenolic compounds (PCs) that constituent part of the indigestible fraction (IF).

This fraction reaches the colon and acts as a carbon and energy source for intestinal microbiota. The effect of mango IF on intestinal microbiota during colonic fermentation is unknown. In this study, the isolated IF of a novel.

Summary. Fermentation of undigested foods in the colon by its resident bacteria affects not only colonic health (protection against inflammation and tumour formation) but also influences metabolic health. Studying fermentation directly is difficult for lack of access. We hypothesise that the anatomical structure of the colon is suited to act as a fermenting chamber with the gaseous molecules (VOCs) emitted having direct effects on the colonocytes as well as gut neural and metabolic.

Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes.

By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be hydrolyzed by mammalian host enzymes and thus. the topic of diet and colonic fermentation. As this is an exploratory review, both clinical and pre-clinical studies relating to the topic with no restriction on publication date.

Papers were excluded if they were not written in the English language or have a full-text. END-PRODUCTS OF PROTEIN FERMENTATION AND THEIR COLONIC EFFECTS.

To analyze colonic microbial metabolites, the most conventional way is by application of a hypothesis-driven targeted approach, through quantification of selected metabolites from carbohydrate (e.g., short-chain fatty acids) and protein fermentation (e.g., p-cresol, phenol, ammonia, or H 2 S), secondary bile acids, or colonic enzymes.

The. NSP undergoes fermentation at a relatively slow rate, but its main properties allow for dilution of luminal concentrations of protein fermentation end‐products via effects on faecal bulk.

NSP also hastens transit through the colon and this minimises the extent of protein breakdown by bacteria. In addition, carbohydrate fermentation. María Cuevas-Tena, José D.

Bermúdez, Ramona de los Ángeles Silvestre, Amparo Alegría, María Jesús Lagarda, Impact of colonic fermentation on sterols after the intake of a plant sterol-enriched beverage: A randomized, double-blind crossover trial, Clinical Nutrition, /, ().

Abstract. To assess the effects of increased colonic fermentation on serum lipids, eight healthy volunteers were placed on two identical 2-wk metabolic diets, one of which was supplemented with lactulose (18–25 g/d). Colonic Fermentation. Longitudinal metabolic and gut bacterial profiling of pregnant women with previous bariatric surgery.

Effects of targeted delivery of propionate to the human colon on appetite regulation, body weight maintenance and adiposity in overweight adults.

Ampicillin, and colonic fermentation of carbohydrate, Amylase, gastrointestinal and metabolic effects of inhibition in diabetes, Amyloidosis, renal, in ulcerative colitis, colchicine therapy, Anaphylaxis immunological reactions of intestinal epithelium (rat), In our own previous studies in which we related colonic fermentation patterns to parameters of cytotoxicity, we identified compounds like propionic acid, medium chain fatty acids, 1-octanol and heptanal as more prevalent in the most cytotoxic samples .Apples are a rich source of polyphenols and fiber.

A major proportion of apple polyphenols escape absorption in the small intestine and together with non-digestible polysaccharides reach the colon, where they can serve as substrates for bacterial fermentation. Animal studies suggest a synergistic interaction between apple polyphenols and the soluble fiber pectin; however, the effects of whole.